Research for Critical review – BORO exhibtion – Somerset House

BORO EXHIBITION – Somerset House, London ( 2nd April to 26th April)

Exhibition leaflet - promises to be good !

Exhibition leaflet – promises to be good !

Just before the exhibition ended I managed to get to London to see the Boro exhibition at Somerset house to gather a further insight to this technique and to obtain some detailed photographs in preparation for my critical review.

One of the rooms at Somerset House exhibiting the Boro works

One of the rooms at Somerset House exhibiting the Boro works

 

BORO – Translated to ‘rags’ in English, boro is the collective name for items – usually clothing and bed covers – made by the poor, rural population of Japan who could not afford to buy new when need required and had to literally make ends meet by piecing and patching discarded cotton onto existing sets, forming something slightly different each time they did so. Generations of Japanese families repaired and recycled fishermen’s jackets to futon covers, handing them down to the next and weaving their own sagas and stories through the threads.

An original item of clothing - Boro in its primary source

An original item of clothing – Boro in its primary source

Cotton was an expensive and sought-after material in rural Japan, so worn-out clothing was passed along and used as futon/bed coverings, the worn-out parts re-worked and replaced with new patches as necessary. The pieces are stunning and are now considered as highly collectible artworks in Western countries. Incredible layering of tonal values of indigo and woven patterns, assortment of fabric combinations, dyeing and Sashiko hand embroidery techniques used for utilitarian purposes resulting in dense layering of textures.

These are some of the photographs from a stunning exhibition.  I hope from this I can make the necessary connection for my review.

Boro quilt

Boro quilt

Detail

Detail

Detail of another Boro quilt.

Detail of another Boro quilt.

 

The most gorgeous glossy book to accompany the exhibtion

The most gorgeous glossy book to accompany the exhibition

Open page 1

Open page 1

Open page 2

Open page 2

Open page 3 - super detail for inspiration

Open page 3 – super detail for inspiration

 

UPDATE ON BORO TEXTILES – Follow this link to see a slide gallery of the Boro Textiles that we exhibited.     http://www.gordonreeceabstractart.co.uk/Gordon_Reece/Home.html

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And still to connect is the work of other artists like Mathew Harris …… to be continued.

Pittcroft Whip Ha’, pigment and dye on folded and stitched cloth, 130 x 70cm, is Matthew Harris’ completed cloth artwork for Field Notes. The name makes reference to fields listed on the ‘Leeke Survey’, a historic record of the carving and cutting up of land where fields have become fragments, floating free of any surrounding landscape. One of the starting points for Field Notes project was a visit to the Shropshire Archive which has an inspirational collection of ancient maps

Pittcroft Whip Ha’, pigment and dye on folded and stitched cloth, 130 x 70cm, is Matthew Harris’ completed cloth artwork for Field Notes. The name makes reference to fields listed on the ‘Leeke Survey’, a historic record of the carving and cutting up of land where fields have become fragments, floating free of any surrounding landscape. One of the starting points for Field Notes project was a visit to the Shropshire Archive which has an inspirational collection of ancient maps

 

Please view link below to see staged video outlining the process that Mathew Harris uses for his style of work.

Yellow – shows how he stains and designs both sides of his fabric.

Construction – one

Construction  – two

Folding – shows the pleating, twisting and stitching towards the final piece.

 

 

 

FIELDNOTES – The making and construction of in stages

 

This entry was posted in LEVEL 2 - TEXTILES 2 : Contemporary Practice, The Critical Review, The critical review and final project and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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