EXERCISE – Putting together your portfolio – Sample and sample evaluation

PLEASE NOTE THAT I MAY NOT BE ABLE TO SEND ALL OF THESE SAMPLES TO THE TUTOR 

Brief –

  • Choose a minimum of 3 themes.
  • Make a note of the reasons behind this choice then extend research in sketchbook – initial studies through drawing and other media.
  • Portfolio  – at least 10 piecies of more developed work organised so the original source is clearly shown.

Sample evaluation

Narrowing my choice down to 3 themes was a challenge as I had a substantial collection of images to work from much more than I think I would do if I had actually gone to a museum. This doesn’t necessarily mean it was a better way of working as I downloaded so many images as I wasn’t really sure which direction I would go in or if the 2D image would be informative enough to inspire me whereas a museum visit would have provided more detailed visual information from a 3D artefact to work from. As the brief was to use online galleries I resisted the temptation for back up museum visits but I found it a little frustrating to work this way. I wanted to choose subjects that differed from each other to present more of a challenge, after all, what do you learn from taking the easy route? I settled on Henry Moore, using 2D drawings and photographs of some sculpture, African artefacts in a broad sense encompassing traditional textile items and items of trade/currency and finally amulets which presented another question to answer, when does an amulet become a talisman? The challenge I set myself was not to “reinvent the wheel” and simply replicate something creating my own version like a fabric amulet case or an African print design for example. I wanted to look beyond the obvious when considering design possibilities. I also wanted to create a broad selection of ideas rather than a co-ordinating collection to include surface pattern repeating designs to single pieces of textile art. The subjects were varied so I took the opportunity to be varied in my samples.

Henry Moore

SAMPLE 1 –

 

A paper design taking an element rock elements from a drawing and combining it with a colourway from another lithograph

A paper design taking an element rock elements from a drawing and combining it with a colourway from another lithograph

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGES FOR SAMPLE 1

Stone III 1977 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Stone III 1977 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Figures in Settings & Sculptural Ideas 1949 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Figures in Settings & Sculptural Ideas 1949 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Reclining Mother and Child with Blue Background 1982, published 1983 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Reclining Mother and Child with Blue Background 1982, published 1983 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………

SAMPLE 2

A paper design using a similar drawing technique to HM but the colourway has been changed.

A paper design using a similar drawing technique to HM but the colourway has been changed.

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGES FOR SAMPLE 2

Storm at Forte Dei Marmi 1970-1 Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Storm at Forte Dei Marmi 1970-1 Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Reclining Mother and Child with Blue Background 1982, published 1983 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Reclining Mother and Child with Blue Background 1982, published 1983 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

SAMPLE 3

Using a drawing technique studied and practiced in the previous sample the idea was transferred to calico and stiffened with Paverpol to create a ring as a model for a sculpture/installation.

Using a drawing technique studied and practiced in the previous sample the idea was transferred to calico and stiffened with Paverpol to create a ring as a model for a sculpture/installation.

R1

 

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGES FOR SAMPLE 3

Reclining Mother and Child with Blue Background 1982, published 1983 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Reclining Mother and Child with Blue Background 1982, published 1983 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Storm at Forte Dei Marmi 1970-1 Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Storm at Forte Dei Marmi 1970-1 Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

String Ball

String Ball

Two Women 1970 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Two Women 1970 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

SAMPLE 4

Taking inspiration from a series of lithographs that contained unusual colour combinations and textures, this is one of 4 that respond to these images with print painted textures and stitches.

Taking inspiration from a series of lithographs that contained unusual colour combinations and textures, this is one of 4 that respond to these images with print painted textures and stitches.

Stitch detail

Stitch detail

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGES FOR SAMPLE 4

Contemplative Eye 1974-5 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898

Contemplative Eye 1974-5 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898

Figures in Settings & Sculptural Ideas 1949 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Figures in Settings & Sculptural Ideas 1949 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

SAMPLE 5

Taking inspiration from a series of lithographs that contained unusual colour combinations and textures, this is one of 4 that respond to these images with print painted textures and stitches.

Taking inspiration from a series of lithographs that contained unusual colour combinations and textures, this is one of 4 that respond to these images with print painted textures and stitches.

 

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 5

Hiding Eye 1974-5 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Hiding Eye 1974-5 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

……………………………………………………………………………………………..

SAMPLE 6

Taking inspiration from a series of lithographs that contained unusual colour combinations and textures, this is one of 4 that respond to these images with print painted textures and stitches.

Taking inspiration from a series of lithographs that contained unusual colour combinations and textures, this is one of 4 that respond to these images with print painted textures and stitches.

C2

 

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 6

Superior Eye 1974-5 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Superior Eye 1974-5 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

SAMPLE 7

Taking inspiration from a series of lithographs that contained unusual colour combinations and textures, this is one of 4 that respond to these images with print painted textures and stitches.

Taking inspiration from a series of lithographs that contained unusual colour combinations and textures, this is one of 4 that respond to these images with print painted textures and stitches.

HH2

 

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGES FOR SAMPLE 7

Pallas Heads 1973 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Pallas Heads 1973 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Architecture 1971-3 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

Architecture 1971-3 by Henry Moore OM, CH 1898-1986

String Ball

String Ball

The challenge when using an artist as inspiration is to understand their style of working and technique so I made studies of his illustrations to inspire print designs that could be produced by digital or even screen printing. I also took inspiration from some unusual colour combinations in his lithographic prints as a starting point and pieces of sculpture, sometimes theses were combined to create ideas for one off pieces and ideas for textile sculpture. I really enjoyed this subject choice despite the initial perceived limitations and found that once I started to make samples I was overrun with ideas and needed to move on to another subject. For further development I would like to concentrate on the circular sculpture, possibly as a repeated structure and thinking more about the scale of it. I recently visited the Museum of Mechanical Design In Stratford Upon Avon and was inspired by a rotating wooden strung mobile within a dark room used in conjunction with a projector and coloured image so that the black dense shadow was ever changing on the brightly coloured wall projection. I have included some pictures but they don’t do the structure much justice but I made the connection between that and my idea on how to develop my sample.

Mobile, shadow and projection on wall

Mobile, shadow and projection on wall

Mobile set up

Mobile set up

African artefacts

I thought this would be the easiest subject but interestingly I struggled to find a new way to approach it. I suspect this was due to the colour pallete being “African colours” so most ideas became African without much invention and it didn’t really motivate me. I have explained these individually as the subjects vary greatly.

SAMPLE 1 Flexing triangle fabric  I am pleased with the wooden triangle “fabric” as like how I have used the flat pattern to create a 3D surface and although I like the idea of adding another dimension with the hand cut printed pattern this hasn’t worked as well as I had imagined. The idea of having a pattern is right but the pattern itself isn’t quite right. The photograph below shows how the triangle mould when the fabric is manipulated.

Wooden African  "fabric" flexed and before decoration.

Wooden African “fabric” flexed and before decoration.

w2

Wooden triangle flex fabric with printed images

Wooden triangle flex fabric with printed images

 

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 1

raffia pile cloth

raffia pile cloth

Screen I 1962-3 by Robert Adams 1917-1984

Screen I 1962-3 by Robert Adams 1917-1984

kuba cloth from con

kuba cloth from con

……………………………………………………………………………………………………….

SAMPLE 2 The Cowrie shell used as currency sample also needs further development. I wanted to use the currency theme and the circle representing our understanding of currency but on this size sample it’s taken on the feel of a Polynesian grass skirt so I think to get the idea across I would need to work on a much larger scale. And possibly not even with shells but using something to represents the shells. The scale of this is key. I didn’t devote any more time to it as I knew sewing lots of shells wasn’t a good use of time but in a more professional project I would work on this more. Probably still with natural substrates ( maybe the white barkcloth in the sketchbook used for the Mbuti idea) but using other materials to create the shells which on a larger sample would be more of a possibility. Perhaps painting with fruit juice ( Persimon for example) for a base pattern and sewing on hand made ceramic rings for shells. Maybe even scorch marks.

Currency shell roll

Currency shell roll

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 2

Cowrie shell currency strings used for trade and exchange in africa pitts

Cowrie shell currency strings used for trade and exchange in africa

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

SAMPLE 3 – Kantanga bronze cross – Ghana exchange/trade currency. I used a little artistic license with this one as currency would need to be wrapped or carried in something for safe keeping so I used backcloth ( although from a different region, Uganda and not Ghana) and taking all the most interesting sections  I reassemble them in a rather naively stitched way to create a purse wrap. Bronze is also a very hard colour to achieve and it took several attempts to arrive at something I was happy enough to use. Again a vast subject as there are many designs used for Gold Weights ( to weigh gold dust ) so offers good graphic inspiration but the theme of currency items is also varied as it spear heads, shell disks, raffia cloth mats, salt bars and fabric rolls to name only a few.

Main design

Main design

small crosses on side and then foiling over the top

small crosses on side and then foiling over the top

small crosses within large cross

small crosses within large cross

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 3

Katanga Cross and bracelets

Katanga Cross and bracelets

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

SAMPLE 4 – The Congo hat  – ideally I could have woven the rapphia to create fabric but the rapphia we know is not the same kind or at least not processed in the same way and rapphia fabric does not exist commercially so I explored other ways of creating a flat base on which to work. I had seen Paverpol, a fabric stiffener, used on natural straw fibres for sculpture suitable for use outdoors so I used this to bond the strands together. Although it worked it made the “fabric” fragile as it snapped so I bonded them further with stitching. The other fibre I picked up from The Scrapstore local to me, I think it may be coconut fibre but not sure but it gave another natural texture with which to work. The burn holes were necessary to enable me to sew through the fibres as they bonded really well. Originally I wanted to print on this substrate but it wasn’t possible, there is a sample in the sketchbook.

Inspired by congo raffia feather hat

Inspired by congo raffia feather hat

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 4

CONGO CURRENCY HAT mid 20th century (feathers & raffia fibre)

CONGO CURRENCY HAT mid 20th century (feathers & raffia fibre)

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………

SAMPLE 5 – Printed chevron “Rapffia” cloth I am happy with the most. The image that inspired me was interesting as the black print was not perfect so I used this to create an intentionally poorly printed lino cut onto gesso treated and dyed fabric as I knew this would resist the print a little. I wanted to use it in a concertina fold to duplicate and reference the chevron pattern and although it worked as I had intended the wood I used was a little too think and perhaps stiffened pelmet Vilene may have been better. As a sample I am happy with it and can see ways to develop this idea further.

z1

Printed chevron cloth  with the chevron pattern repeated in the structure

Printed chevron cloth with the chevron pattern repeated in the structure

 

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 5

man's skirt raffia palm fibre

man’s skirt raffia palm fibre

Kuba Bark cloth

Kuba Bark cloth

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Amulets – a vast subject.  Since the beginning of time amulets have been used as items to believe in for protection against evil and harm but also for good fortune and health. I found this fascinating and could have created a body of work just on this subject alone. My sample images included the expected prayer amulet cases but I was more drawn to the simplicity of the early Neolithic stone amulets that would have been treasured and carried at all times. I was also intrigued by the belief of the Egyptian amulets used for protection when passing the through to the other world. With these 2 ideas in mind my samples concentrate on the wrapped copper foil Roman stone and how I also collect treasures along my way and have wealth of intriguing beach stones and a more contemporary version being beach sea pottery but also on the vibrancy of the turquoise of the Egyptian Faience beads and the deterioration of the mummy fibres. In addition I was also engrossed in the story behind the amulet collection at Pitt Rivers museum (close to me in Oxford, a favourite of mine but I did not visit despite the pull of it!) and in particular the story of Edward Lovett, an Edwardian Folklorist who became obsessive over collecting amulets from the then risky and suspect areas of East London. I became so intrigued that I even tried to secure his 1925 published book on EBay but lost out in the bidding war. What struck me about the gallery  images was how these sometimes bizarre, sometimes distasteful items, had been in a state of movement for their entire useful life but once surrendered to Edward Lovett, and certainly the museum, they became very static and almost frozen in time. It was for that reason I decided the half encapsulate my similar items, sourced from charity shops and the metal detecting 99p sales on EBay in casting resin. I didn’t fully encapsulate them as I didn’t want to create my childhood memories of paperweights but instead to give the promise of hope that they once might be believed in again.  I like the idea of this very much and I am still looking out for suitable artefacts to develop this idea further. This will take time and I will probably revisit it in a few years….and hopefully with a copy of the book to discover the stories behind the items.

SAMPLE 1

Using a Roman stone collected (from the beach?) as an amulet and wrapped in copper wire I translated this to beach pottery stones that I had collected and wrapped a copper wire net around them.

Using a Roman stone collected (from the beach?) as an amulet and wrapped in copper wire I translated this to beach pottery stones that I had collected and wrapped a copper wire net around them.

2 3

 

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 1

prehistory bronze wire and stone amulet

prehistory bronze wire and stone amulet

SAMPLE 2

Using a Roman stone collected and wrapped in wire as inspiration this was created as a response using felt stones and copper wire in a distressed "carry cloth" for protection.

Using a Roman stone collected and wrapped in wire as inspiration this was created as a response using felt stones and copper wire in a distressed “carry cloth” for protection.

detail

detail – PLEASE NOTE I did not make these felt stones as they were used from a necklace I had.

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 2

prehistory bronze wire and stone amulet

prehistory bronze wire and stone amulet

SAMPLE 3

Using Egyptian Faience glass bead amulet as inspiration for a stitch and "glass" fragmented response

Using Egyptian Faience glass bead amulet as inspiration for a stitch and “glass” fragmented response

Like the play of light in this idea

Like the play of light in this idea

ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 3

Egyptian amulet FAIENCE beaded net

Egyptian amulet FAIENCE beaded net

SAMPLE 4

There was one image of Faience beads and mummy bandages in a box that really caught my imagination. This is my response to that using a modern box to carry the idea. The following detailed photos show how this idea works just as well being contained within the box.

There was one image of Faience beads and mummy bandages in a box that really caught my imagination. This is my response to that using a modern box to carry the idea. The following detailed photos show how this idea works just as well being contained within the box.

Looks great standing on top of the box

Looks great standing on top of the box

Like how the beads stand up

Like how the beads stand up

view from above

view from above

Interesting texture beneath too !!

Interesting texture beneath too !!

ORIIGINAL SOURCE IMAGE FOR SAMPLE 4

Faience shabtis and Horus Child AMULET beads and mummy bandages

Faience shabtis and Horus Child AMULET beads and mummy bandages

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

SAMPLE 5

Captivated by the stories behind the English Folklorist Edward Lovett and the "captured in time" images at the Pitt Rivers museum of the amulets he collected in East London I cast similar items as a sample to see what could be done. Photographed onto dye silk to represent the River Thames.

Captivated by the stories behind the English Folklorist Edward Lovett and the “captured in time” images at the Pitt Rivers museum of the amulets he collected in East London I cast similar items as a sample to see what could be done. Photographed onto dye silk to represent the River Thames.

S2

 

 

S4 ORIGINAL SOURCE IMAGES FOR SAMPLE 5

st Dominics charm

st Dominics charm

pink glass sea horse

pink glass sea horse

unlucky lucky 13

unlucky lucky 13

snake stone

snake stone

mini shrine in bullet case

mini shrine in bullet case

sharks tooth

sharks tooth

old coin and skin from murderer

old coin and skin from murderer

As usual my work has thrown up other questions that I ask of myself and still search to find the answer. I mentioned the amulet question earlier and how does this differ from a talisman but also what is the difference between these two when worn around the neck and an item of jewellery. The differences are subtle I am sure and perhaps only becomes one or the other depending on the attachment or belief in a worn item. But I am also asking myself what is the difference between being inspired by something or being influenced by something. My best answer so far would be

Influence – it says something to me, it affects me and I adapt it for my own creation of the same thing, something quite instant and as a direct result of something. Possibly even bordering on being too close to the original.

Inspiration – it caused me to act or do something, I felt moved by it to do something but it’s not always directly linked as it could have evolved over some time. It’s a starting point, a creative flash.

Link to Museum of Art and Mechanical Design.

http://themadmuseum.co.uk/

This entry was posted in LEVEL 2 - P3 - Working from museums - Project - A portfolio of visual resources - Exercise - Putting together your portfolio, LEVEL 2 - P3 - Working from museums - Project - Storytelling with imagery and text, LEVEL 2 - P3 - Working from museums - Project 2 - A portfolio of visual resources - Sample evaluation, LEVEL 2 - TEXTILES 2 : Contemporary Practice and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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