RESEARCH POINT – research traditional craft techniques and designers using them

BRIEF

  1. Research traditional craft techniques and historic processes that I feel I could apply in my own work.
  2. Look at how some contemporary textiles practioners use traditional techniques to add value and meaning to their work.
  3. Pick one or 2 examples to explore in more detail

1 – List of traditional craft techniques and historic processes, Note to self – Think about the techniques used and are they generic or do they differ at all? weaving for example can be Ikat / Kilim / or tapestry but although they are all weaving they vary and have their own style name of weaving. Other crafts like lace making are very similar to crochet and then macramé.

  • IKAT weaving – Laos, Thailand, Indonesia
  • BATIK with wax – Java, China, Thailand, Bali, Malaysia etc – all different styles
  • KILIM weaving – Turkey
  • TRIBAL  – printing onto RAFFIA / BARK CLOTH or is this just the making of the base cloth ?
  • PRINTING – old methods are WOOD BLOCK (Indonesia) and ADINKRA (Africa)
  • KNITTING – HAND and NAALBINDING
  • FRENCH KNITTING – perhaps too modern.
  • WEAVING – TAPESTRY
  • CROCHET
  • MACRAME
  • FELT MAKING – FELT RUGS ( Kyrgyzstan) / YURTS
  • SPINNING – or is this just a stage between raw fibre and weaving? Like carding is?
  • LACE – BOBBIN LACE
  • LACE – NEEDLE LACE
  • QUILTING – by hand TRAPUNTO
  • APPLIQUE – APPLIED and REVERSE
  • RUG MAKING – tapestry /weaving or rag rugs
  • TRADTIONAL DYEING – using NATURAL PLANTS DYES / INDIGO
  • DYEING TECHNIQUES – APPLIED RESIST using paste or wax / TIED RESIST Shibori / tie dye etc / STITCH RESIST / CLAMP RESIST / MUD CLOTH using pigments
  • PATCHWORK (INDIAN style) with hand stitch. JAPANESE BORO with hand stitch and more recent LOG CABIN fabric scraps
  • SMOCKING
  • STENCILLING – usually to apply starch resist paste for dyeing like with Japanese fabrics
  • EMBROIDERY – all hand techniques CREWEL / STUMPWORK and (TRIBAL HMONG)
  • HAND STITCHING – like KANTHA running stitch and Japanese techniques like SASHIKO
  • COUCHING
  • DRAWN THREAD / PULLED THREAD
  • STRIPE WEAVE and KENTE (Ghana)– African techniques of joining strips of fabric together
  • COILING – like basket weaving
  • BASKET WEAVING
  • TATTING
  • PLY SPLITTING
  • PASSEMENTERIE – Ropes and tassels
  • BRAIDING – narrow weaving
  • SPRANG – like braiding
  • ZULU BEADWORK
  • FEATHER AND WOVEN HATS CAMEROON – raffia basket work and feathers

2 – Look at how some contemporary textiles practioners use traditional techniques to add value and meaning to their work.

Examples of some techniques to follow. These are all contemporary artists and I have indicated the technique that have used. What I have noted is that, yet again, there is cross over with some techniques. Janet Edmonds – couching, embroidery and basketmaking skills for example.

WEAVE  FIONA RUTHERFORD - photosource http://www.yorkartworkers.org.uk

WEAVE
FIONA RUTHERFORD – photosource http://www.yorkartworkers.org.uk

 WEAVE  SUSIE GILLESPIE - http://www.browngrotta.com


WEAVE
SUSIE GILLESPIE – http://www.browngrotta.com

FELT HEATHER BELCHER - http://www.vebidoo.de

FELT
HEATHER BELCHER – http://www.vebidoo.de

CROCHET DOROTHY ANN DAILY-http://www.textileartist.org

CROCHET
DOROTHY ANN DAILY-http://www.textileartist.org

LACE MAKING LOUISE WEST - http://www.artsderbyshire.org.uk

LACE MAKING
LOUISE WEST – http://www.artsderbyshire.org.uk

 KNITTING - LARGE SCALE DAVID COLE - http://peppermags.blogspot.co.uk


KNITTING – LARGE SCALE
DAVID COLE – http://peppermags.blogspot.co.uk

KNITTING/WEAVING - URBAN GORILLA STYLE SHANE WALTERNER - http://shanewaltener.com/installations

KNITTING/WEAVING – URBAN GORILLA STYLE
SHANE WALTERNER – http://shanewaltener.com/installations

KNITTING - URBAN GORILLA STYLE MAGDA SAYEG - http://threads-of-a-story.blogspot.co.uk

KNITTING – URBAN GORILLA STYLE
MAGDA SAYEG – http://threads-of-a-story.blogspot.co.uk

COILING - FREEFORM MARY ANN MORRISON http://www.maryannemorrison.co.uk

COILING – FREEFORM
MARY ANN MORRISON http://www.maryannemorrison.co.uk

COILING  JANET EDMONDS - http://annekata.com

COILING
JANET EDMONDS – http://annekata.com

COILING AND BASKETMAKING JEAN DRAPER - COILING textilestudygroup.co.uk/members/jean-draper

COILING AND BASKETMAKING
JEAN DRAPER  textilestudygroup.co.uk/members/jean-draper

COUCHING JEAN DRAPER COUCHING textilestudygroup.co.uk/members/jean-draper

COUCHING
JEAN DRAPER – textilestudygroup.co.uk/members/jean-draper

APPLIQUE TRACEY EMIN - http://departmentart.co.uk

APPLIQUE
TRACEY EMIN – http://departmentart.co.uk

EMBROIDERY - KANTHA STITCH LYN SETTERINGTON - http://www.lynnsetterington.co.uk

EMBROIDERY – KANTHA STITCH
LYN SETTERINGTON – http://www.lynnsetterington.co.uk

SASHIKO STITCH  - modern application. LUCY ARAI - http://www.fiberarts.com

SASHIKO STITCH – modern application.
LUCY ARAI – http://www.fiberarts.com

EMBROIDERY TILLEKE SCHWARTZ - http://tillekeschwarz.com

EMBROIDERY
TILLEKE SCHWARTZ – http://tillekeschwarz.com

SHIBORI - REVERSE WITH DISCHARGE REGINNA BENSON - http://www.reginabenson.com/installations.html

SHIBORI – REVERSE WITH DISCHARGE
REGINNA BENSON – http://www.reginabenson.com/installations.html

RAG RUG MAKING DEBBIE SINISKA - http://www.debbiesiniska.co.uk

RAG RUG MAKING
DEBBIE SINISKA – http://www.debbiesiniska.co.uk

SMOCKING CAROLINE LEONARD - http://www.odysseytextileart.co.uk

SMOCKING
CAROLINE LEONARD – http://www.odysseytextileart.co.uk

BORO - STRIP AND STITCH JILLI BLACKWOOD - http://www.jilliblackwood.com

BORO – STRIP AND STITCH
JILLI BLACKWOOD – http://www.jilliblackwood.com

3 – Pick one or 2 examples to explore in more detail (follows on from Look at how some contemporary textiles practioners use traditional techniques to add value and meaning to their work)

….. wasn’t sure if I understood the question properly. Was I to pick one of 2 designers to explore further or one or 2 examples of techniques to explore further…. So my following work combines both, my chosen technique which is shibori and the artists that use the shibori techniques in general to provide inspiration ( arashi, itijame clamp resist, indigo dye etc) and then focussing on a couple in more detail towards the end. I knew this research would lead onto my samples so I thought this was the best approach as preparation for the practical work.

ARTISTS USING SHIBORI – some small thumb nail pictures as a visual prompt to me to see the possibilities of this technique.

JAN MEYERS NEWBURY http://www.janmyersnewbury.com

JAN MEYERS NEWBURY
www.janmyersnewbury.com

US Artist who concentrates on Arashi pole wrap techniques and uses fibre reactive dyes on cotton and in multiple colours. She then cuts and reassembles them as wall quilts.

MICHAEL SMITH www. michaelsilks.com

MICHAEL SMITH
www. michaelsilks.com

Creates shibori multi coloured articles of clothing and silk and/or cotton scarves.

Well known for her book on the subject of Shibori has created various textile pieces using this process and machine quilting them.

Creates silk scarves and silk chiffon tops with the clamp resist itijame. The scale of the resist pattern is very large and the colours are not what you would normally associate with shibori dye.

Creates scarves with the heat set version of shibori giving each 3 dimensional shape.

Anne Selby is a designer/maker who creates unique and luxurious stoles, boas and scarves in silk using a variety of techniques including hand painting and heat set Arashi Shibori pleating.

Traditional concepts with unpredictable layouts.

A UK textile artist who has specialised in indigo and shibori dye – also dyes with Ferrous Oxide (rust) in the shibori resist patterns. It is the rust dyeing aspect that interests me more than the traditional patterns.

UK textile artist who practices shibori using the traditional indigo method right through to other dyes and techniques for a modern twist.

Regina Benson is an artist whose work I have long admired but (understandably) she keeps her technique a closely guarded secret. I have not been able to find any good quality images either to upload as they are small and I lose the image quality. From studying her work I understand that she uses shibori techniques with a discharge paste to create a reverse pattern. She dyes with natural, acid and disperse types and incorporates other techniques also along with soy wax resist and machine quilting plus more unusual methods like burning.

MARIE- HELENE GUELTON – This artist has developed her own technique derived from Arashi and nui shibori to create the above textile piece. Below are more examples of her work from her website, they are, unfortunately, without descriptions or any further information but I have studied them and tried to work out her techniques.

MARIE HELENE GUELOT Arashi shibori

MARIE HELENE GUELOT
Arashi shibori

MARIE-HELENE GUELOT Stitch resist shibori

MARIE-HELENE GUELOT
Stitch resist shibori

MARIE-HELENE GUELOT Resist shibori

MARIE-HELENE GUELOT
Resist shibori

MARIE HELENE GUELOT I think this is a stitch or wax resist that has then been stitched together and possibly with some embroidery over the top ?

MARIE HELENE GUELOT
I think this is a stitch or wax resist that has then been stitched together and possibly with some embroidery over the top ?

MARIE HELEN GUELOT Stitch resist i think but not sure why half is darker. Like this one very much.

MARIE HELEN GUELOT
Stitch resist i think but not sure why half is darker. Like this one very much.

MARIE HELENE GUELOT

MARIE HELENE GUELOT

MARIE HELENE GUELOT Stitch resist

MARIE HELENE GUELOT
Stitch resist

MARIE HELENE GUELTON Stitch resist

MARIE HELENE GUELTON
Stitch resist

MARIE HELENE GUELOT Clamp resist

MARIE HELENE GUELOT
Clamp resist

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO – A Japanese artist who blends the traditional Japanese craft of indigo dyeing, ‘shibori’, and tonal gradation dyeing, ‘bokashi’.  Her work has a very contemporary feel to it but it still evokes the feeling of tradition.” Shihoko Fukumoto often invents her own techniques and tools in order to achieve the result she desires. She continues to approach her work with experimentation working with the properties of the age old dyeing process to make new discoveries. Despite only using indigo dye for her fabrics, the artist achieves a range of blues within her work from the very lightest to deep dark hues. This illustrates the painstaking procedures involved in her craft that demands great skill and patience. Originally Shihoko studied painting but early on in her career on an overseas trip to New Guinea she experienced a spiritual and aesthetic revelation when she studied the local craftspeople of New Guinea making things which were linked to their culture, their religion, the very way they lived their lives. She realised she did not have the same connection to her own work. On her return to Japan Shihoko found herself “spiritually attracted by the depth and dimension of natural indigo,” which, in Japan, dates from the Heian period (800-1180). Although she had no background in the art it was then she turned her attention towards this medium. Shihoko began a long period of study with traditional indigo-dyeing artists, learning the process start to finish. She even mastered the complicated stitching for shibori (tie-dyeing), which is traditionally done by specialists and not dyers.

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

SHIHOKO FUKUMOTO

HIROYUKI SHINDO – A Japanese artist using indigo dyeing methods.

HIROYUKI SHINDO

HIROYUKI SHINDO

HIROYUKI SHINDO

HIROYUKI SHINDO

I think I will take inspiration from all these artists but in different ways.

This entry was posted in 2 Research point - using all resources traditional find craft techniques/historical processes, LEVEL 2 - TEXTILES 2 : Contemporary Practice, Project 3 - Craft and hand textiles, TEXTILES 2 - PART 2 - Sustainable textiles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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